European Cup



History of European cup:


The European Cup, also known as the UEFA Champions League, is an annual club football competition organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). Here are some important details about the history of the competition:



The first European Cup was played in the 1955-56 season, with 16 teams participating. The inaugural final was contested by Real Madrid and Stade de Reims, with Real Madrid emerging as champions.



Real Madrid is the most successful club in the competition's history, having won it a record 13 times. They won the first five editions of the competition from 1956 to 1960, and have won it four times in the last decade (2014, 2016, 2017, and 2018).



The format of the competition has evolved over time. Initially, it was a knockout tournament with just one round of matches, but in 1992, a group stage was introduced, followed by a knockout phase. The current format, which features a group stage followed by knockout rounds, was introduced in 2003-04.



The competition has seen some memorable finals over the years. The 1960 final, in which Real Madrid beat Eintracht Frankfurt 7-3, is widely regarded as one of the greatest finals in the competition's history. The 1999 final, in which Manchester United scored two goals in injury time to beat Bayern Munich 2-1, is also considered a classic.



The competition has also seen some dominant individual performances. Lionel Messi is the competition's all-time top scorer, with 135 goals. Cristiano Ronaldo is second on the list, with 135 goals.



The competition has been won by clubs from 12 different countries. Spain has the most winners, with 18 titles, followed by Italy (12), England (7), and Germany (7).



The current champions are Paris Saint-Germain, who won their first title in the 2020-21 season.





European Cup Winner and Runner up Teams: 


Here are the winners and runners-up of the UEFA Champions League (formerly known as the European Cup) since the competition's inception in 1955-56:



1955-56: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Stade de Reims

1956-57: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Fiorentina

1957-58: Winner - Manchester United; Runner-up - Benfica

1958-59: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Stade de Reims

1959-60: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Eintracht Frankfurt

1960-61: Winner - Benfica; Runner-up - Barcelona

1961-62: Winner - Benfica; Runner-up - Real Madrid

1962-63: Winner - AC Milan; Runner-up - Benfica

1963-64: Winner - Internazionale; Runner-up - Real Madrid

1964-65: Winner - Internazionale; Runner-up - Benfica

1965-66: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Partizan

1966-67: Winner - Celtic; Runner-up - Internazionale

1967-68: Winner - Manchester United; Runner-up - Benfica

1968-69: Winner - AC Milan; Runner-up - Ajax

1969-70: Winner - Feyenoord; Runner-up - Celtic

1970-71: Winner - Ajax; Runner-up - Panathinaikos

1971-72: Winner - Ajax; Runner-up - Internazionale

1972-73: Winner - Ajax; Runner-up - Juventus

1973-74: Winner - Bayern Munich; Runner-up - Atlético Madrid

1974-75: Winner - Bayern Munich; Runner-up - Leeds United

1975-76: Winner - Liverpool; Runner-up - Club Brugge

1976-77: Winner - Liverpool; Runner-up - Borussia Mönchengladbach

1977-78: Winner - Liverpool; Runner-up - Club Brugge

1978-79: Winner - Nottingham Forest; Runner-up - Malmö FF

1979-80: Winner - Nottingham Forest; Runner-up - Hamburg

1980-81: Winner - Liverpool; Runner-up - Real Madrid

1981-82: Winner - Internazionale; Runner-up - Aston Villa

1982-83: Winner - Hamburg; Runner-up - Juventus

1983-84: Winner - Liverpool; Runner-up - Roma

1984-85: Winner - Juventus; Runner-up - Liverpool

1985-86: Winner - Steaua București; Runner-up - Barcelona

1986-87: Winner - Porto; Runner-up - Bayern Munich

1987-88: Winner - PSV Eindhoven; Runner-up - Benfica

1988-89: Winner - AC Milan; Runner-up - Steaua București

1989-90: Winner - AC Milan; Runner-up - Benfica

1990-91: Winner - Red Star Belgrade; Runner-up - Marseille

1991-92: Winner - Barcelona; Runner-up - Sampdoria

1992-93: Winner - Marseille; Runner-up - AC Milan

1993-94: Winner - AC Milan; Runner-up - Barcelona

1994-95: Winner - Ajax; Runner-up - AC Milan

1995-96: Winner - Juventus; Runner-up - Ajax

1996-97: Winner - Borussia Dortmund; Runner-up - Juventus

1997-98: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Juventus

1998-99: Winner - Manchester United; Runner-up - Bayern Munich

1999-2000: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Valencia

2000-01: Winner - Bayern Munich; Runner-up - Valencia

2001-02: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Bayer Leverkusen

2002-03: Winner - AC Milan; Runner-up - Juventus

2003-04: Winner - FC Porto; Runner-up - AS Monaco

2004-05: Winner - Liverpool; Runner-up - AC Milan

2005-06: Winner - Barcelona; Runner-up - Arsenal

2006-07: Winner - AC Milan; Runner-up - Liverpool

2007-08: Winner - Manchester United; Runner-up - Chelsea

2008-09: Winner - Barcelona; Runner-up - Manchester United

2009-10: Winner - Inter Milan; Runner-up - Bayern Munich

2010-11: Winner - Barcelona; Runner-up - Manchester United

2011-12: Winner - Chelsea; Runner-up - Bayern Munich

2012-13: Winner - Bayern Munich; Runner-up - Borussia Dortmund

2013-14: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Atletico Madrid

2014-15: Winner - Barcelona; Runner-up - Juventus

2015-16: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Atletico Madrid

2016-17: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Juventus

2017-18: Winner - Real Madrid; Runner-up - Liverpool

2018-19: Winner - Liverpool; Runner-up - Tottenham Hotspur

2019-20: Winner - Bayern Munich; Runner-up - Paris Saint-Germain

2020-21: Winner - Paris Saint-Germain; Runner-up - Manchester City




European Cup Man of the Match


The UEFA Champions League began awarding the man of the match (officially known as "UEFA Champions League Man of the Match Presented by Santander") from the 2008-2009 season onwards. Here are some notable players who have won the award in the Champions League finals:



2009: Lionel Messi (Barcelona vs Manchester United)


2010: Diego Milito (Inter Milan vs Bayern Munich)


2011: Lionel Messi (Barcelona vs Manchester United)


2012: Didier Drogba (Chelsea vs Bayern Munich)


2013: Arjen Robben (Bayern Munich vs Borussia Dortmund)


2014: Diego Godin (Atletico Madrid vs Real Madrid)


2015: Andres Iniesta (Barcelona vs Juventus)


2016: Sergio Ramos (Real Madrid vs Atletico Madrid)


2017: Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid vs Juventus)


2018: Gareth Bale (Real Madrid vs Liverpool)


2019: Virgil van Dijk (Liverpool vs Tottenham Hotspur)


2020: Kingsley Coman (Bayern Munich vs Paris Saint-Germain)


2021: N'Golo Kante (Chelsea vs Manchester City)





European Cup Teams:


The European Cup, now known as the UEFA Champions League, has had numerous participating teams throughout its history. Here are some details on the teams that have competed in the competition:




Real Madrid:

The Spanish giants are the most successful team in the history of the competition, having won it 13 times.




AC Milan:

The Italian club has won the competition seven times, second only to Real Madrid.




Liverpool:

The English club has won the competition six times, including an incredible run of four titles in eight years between 1977 and 1984. 




Bayern Munich:

The German club has won the competition six times, including three consecutive titles between 1974 and 1976. 




Barcelona:

The Spanish club has won the competition five times, including two titles in the last decade (2011 and 2015).




Manchester United:

The English club has won the competition three times, including a dramatic come-from-behind victory in the 1999 final against Bayern Munich.




Ajax:

The Dutch club has won the competition four times, including three consecutive titles between 1971 and 1973.




Inter Milan:

The Italian club has won the competition three times, including a historic treble in 2010 under manager Jose Mourinho. 




Juventus:

The Italian club has won the competition twice, in 1985 and 1996, and finished as runners-up six times.




Benfica:

The Portuguese club has won the competition twice, in 1961 and 1962, and finished as runners-up five times.




Chelsea:

The English club has won the competition once, in 2012, and finished as runners-up once.




Borussia Dortmund:

The German club has won the competition once, in 1997, and finished as runners-up once.




Marseille:

The French club has won the competition once, in 1993, and finished as runners-up once.




Porto:

The Portuguese club has won the competition twice, in 1987 and 2004, and finished as runners-up once.




Celtic:

The Scottish club has won the competition once, in 1967, and finished as runners-up once.




Valencia:

The Spanish club has finished as runners-up in the competition twice, in 2000 and 2001.




Atletico Madrid:

The Spanish club has finished as runners-up in the competition three times, in 1974, 2014, and 2016.




Paris Saint-Germain:

The French club reached the final of the competition for the first time in their history in 2020, but finished as runners-up to Bayern Munich. They also reached the semi-finals in 1995 and 2021.




Tottenham Hotspur:

The English club reached the final of the competition for the first time in their history in 2019, but finished as runners-up to Liverpool.




Manchester City:

The English club has reached the final of the competition once, in 2021, but finished as runners-up to Paris Saint-Germain.




Roma:

The Italian club has reached the final of the competition once, in 1984, but finished as runners-up to Liverpool.




Arsenal:

The English club has reached the final of the competition once, in 2006, but finished as runners-up to Barcelona.




Dynamo Kyiv:

The Ukrainian club has reached the final of the competition twice, in 1975 and 1986, but finished as runners-up on both occasions.




Red Star Belgrade:

The Serbian club won the competition once, in 1991, and also reached the final of the European Cup in 1979, but finished as runners-up to Nottingham Forest.




Nottingham Forest:

The English club won the competition twice, in 1979 and 1980, and also reached the semi-finals in 1982.






Borussia Mönchengladbach:

The German club reached the final of the European Cup twice in the 1970s, but finished as runners-up on both occasions to Liverpool (1977) and Nottingham Forest (1979).




Hamburg:

The German club won the European Cup once, in 1983, and also reached the final in 1980, but finished as runners-up to Nottingham Forest.




Steaua Bucharest:

The Romanian club won the European Cup once, in 1986, in a penalty shootout victory over Barcelona. They  reached  also in the quarter finals in 1988.




PSV Eindhoven:

The Dutch club won the European Cup once, in 1988, and also reached the final in 1986, but finished as runners-up to Steaua Bucharest.




Olympique Marseille:

The French club won the Champions League once, in 1993, and also reached the final in 1991, but finished as runners-up to Red Star Belgrade.





Valencia:

The Spanish club reached the final of the Champions League twice, in 2000 and 2001, but finished as runners-up on both occasions to Real Madrid and Bayern Munich, respectively.




Monaco:

The French club reached the final of the Champions League once, in 2004, but finished as runners-up to Porto.





Shakhtar Donetsk:

The Ukrainian club reached the quarter-finals of the Champions League four times, in 2011, 2012, 2015, and 2018.




Atalanta:

The Italian club reached the quarter-finals of the Champions League twice, in 2020 and 2021.




RB Leipzig:

The German club reached the semi-finals of the Champions League in 2020, but were defeated by Paris Saint-Germain.




Porto:

The Portuguese club won the Champions League twice, in 1987 and 2004, and also reached the quarter-finals or better on six other occasions.




Benfica:

The Portuguese club won the European Cup twice, in 1961 and 1962, and finished as runners-up five times, most recently in 1990.




Celtic:

The Scottish club won the European Cup once, in 1967, becoming the first British team to win the competition. They also reached the final in 1970 but were defeated by Feyenoord.





Ajax:

The Dutch club won the European Cup four times in the 1970s, and also reached the final in 1969 and 1995.





Bayern Munich:

The German club has won the competition six times, most recently in 2020, and has reached the final on ten other occasions.




Liverpool:

The English club has won the European Cup/Champions League six times, most recently in 2019, and has reached the final on three other occasions.





Manchester United:

The English club has won the competition three times, most recently in 2008, and has reached the final on two other occasions.





AC Milan:

The Italian club has won the competition seven times, most recently in 2007, and has reached the final on seven other occasions.





Real Madrid:

The Spanish club has won the competition 13 times, the most of any club, and has reached the final on three other occasions.





Barcelona:

The Spanish club has won the competition five times, most recently in 2015, and has reached the final on four other occasions.





Inter Milan:

The Italian club has won the competition three times, most recently in 2010, and has reached the final on two other occasions.





Juventus:

The Italian club has won the competition twice, most recently in 1996, and has reached the final on seven other occasions.





Chelsea:

The English club has won the competition twice, most recently in 2021, and has reached the final on three other occasions.





Tottenham Hotspur:

The English club reached the final of the competition for the first time in their history in 2019, but were defeated by Liverpool.





Paris Saint-Germain:

The French club reached the final of the competition for the first time in their history in 2020, but were defeated by Bayern Munich.





Atletico Madrid: 

The Spanish club has reached the final of the competition three times, most recently in 2016, but has yet to win the title.





Borussia Dortmund:

The German club has won the competition once, in 1997, and has reached the final on two other occasions.





Marseille:

The French club won the competition once, in 1993, and reached the final in 1991, but finished as runners-up to Red Star Belgrade.





Red Star Belgrade:

The Serbian club won the competition once, in 1991, becoming the first Eastern European club to win the tournament.





Feyenoord:

The Dutch club won the European Cup once, in 1970, and also reached the final in 1974 but were defeated by Bayern Munich.





European Cup Statistics: 

Here are some statistics related to the European Cup/UEFA Champions League:


1. Real Madrid is the most successful club in the history of the competition, having won it 13 times.


2. The most successful country in terms of titles won is Spain, with a total of 18 championships.


3. The most goals scored by a team in a single season is 17, achieved by Barcelona in the 1999-2000 season.


4. The fastest goal in the competition's history was scored by Roy Makaay of Bayern Munich, who scored after just 10.12 seconds against Real Madrid in 2007.


5. Lionel Messi holds the record for the most goals scored in a single season, with 17 goals in the 2011-2012 season.


6. Cristiano Ronaldo is the all-time top scorer in the competition, with a total of 135 goals.


7. AC Milan and Liverpool have both won the competition five times, the third-highest number of titles won.


8. The youngest player to score in the competition is Ansu Fati, who scored for Barcelona at the age of 17 years and 40 days.


9. The largest margin of victory in the competition is 10-0, achieved by Dinamo Bucharest against Crusaders in 1973.


10. The most goals scored by a team in a single game is 11, achieved by Dinamo Zagreb against Albanian club Besa Kavajë in 1982.


11. The most goals scored by a team in a single campaign is 45, achieved by Barcelona in the 1999-2000 season.


12. The highest-scoring match in the competition's history was a 12-1 victory for Real Madrid against Eintracht Frankfurt in the 1960 final.


13. Real Madrid's Cristiano Ronaldo has scored in three Champions League finals, more than any other player in history.


14. The most successful manager in the competition's history is Bob Paisley, who won it three times with Liverpool in 1977, 1978, and 1981.


15. The youngest player to play in the competition is Celestine Babayaro, who played for Anderlecht at the age of 16 years and 87 days in 1994.


16. The oldest player to score in the competition is Francesco Totti, who scored for Roma at the age of 38 years and 59 days in 2014.


17. The most successful country in terms of finalists is Italy, with a total of 28 appearances in the final.


18. The only player to have won the competition with three different clubs is Clarence Seedorf, who won it with Ajax, Real Madrid, and AC Milan.


19. The most successful player in the competition's history is Paolo Maldini, who won it five times with AC Milan.


20. The most consecutive titles won is five, achieved by Real Madrid between 1956 and 1960.


21. The most goals scored by a team in a single knockout stage match is eight, achieved by both Bayern Munich and Liverpool.


22. The most clean sheets kept by a team in a single season is 10, achieved by Manchester United in the 2007-2008 season.


23. The most consecutive clean sheets is 10, achieved by Edwin van der Sar of Manchester United between the 2008 and 2009 seasons.


24. The most goals scored in a single match by a player is five, achieved by Lionel Messi of Barcelona and Luiz Adriano of Shakhtar Donetsk.


25. The most penalties scored in a single match is three, achieved by Ruud van Nistelrooy of Manchester United in a match against Fenerbahce in 2004.


26. The highest-scoring tie in the knockout stages is the 2013-2014 quarter-final between Bayern Munich and Porto, which ended with an aggregate score of 7-4 in favor of Porto.


27. The most assists in a single season is 13, achieved by Neymar of Barcelona in the 2014-2015 season.


28. The most appearances in the competition is 177, held by Iker Casillas.


29. The most successful club in terms of consecutive appearances is Real Madrid, who have appeared in every edition of the competition since its inception in 1955.


30. The most successful club in terms of consecutive seasons reaching the knockout stages is Barcelona, who have reached the last 16 in each of the last 17 seasons.


31. The most hat-tricks scored in the competition is eight, achieved by Cristiano Ronaldo.


32. The most goals scored by a player in a single campaign is 17, achieved by Cristiano Ronaldo in the 2013-2014 season.


33. The most goals scored by a team in a single campaign is 120, achieved by Barcelona in the 2011-2012 season.


34. The most goals scored in a single season is 17, achieved by Lionel Messi in the 2019-2020 season.


35. The most successful club in terms of titles won is Real Madrid, with a total of 13.


36. The most successful country in terms of titles won is Spain, with a total of 18.


37. The most successful club in terms of consecutive victories in the competition is Bayern Munich, who won 10 consecutive matches in the 2019-2020 season.


38. The most successful club in terms of total victories in the competition is Barcelona, who have won 306 matches.


39. The most successful club in terms of goals scored in the competition is Real Madrid, who have scored 1,088 goals.


40. The most successful club in terms of clean sheets in the competition is Juventus, who have kept 63 clean sheets.


41. These statistics continue to showcase the many remarkable performances and achievements that have taken place in the European Cup/UEFA Champions League. As the competition continues to evolve and draw in the world's best teams and players, we can expect to see many more impressive feats in the future.


42. The highest-scoring final in the competition's history was the 7-3 victory for Real Madrid over Eintracht Frankfurt in the 1960 final.


43. The only team to successfully defend their title in the Champions League era is Real Madrid, who did so in 2017 and 2018.


44. The most successful manager in terms of titles won is Bob Paisley, who won the competition three times with Liverpool in the 1970s and 1980s.


45. The youngest player to ever score in the competition is Peter Ofori-Quaye, who scored for Olympiacos against Rosenborg at the age of 17 years and 195 days in 1997.


46. The oldest player to ever score in the competition is Francesco Totti, who scored for Roma against CSKA Moscow at the age of 38 years and 59 days in 2014.


47. The fastest goal in the history of the competition was scored by Roy Makaay, who scored for Bayern Munich against Real Madrid after just 10.12 seconds in 2007.


48. The most successful English club in the competition is Liverpool, who have won the title six times.


49. The most successful Italian club in the competition is AC Milan, who have won the title seven times.


50. The most successful German club in the competition is Bayern Munich, who have won the title six times.


51. The most successful Portuguese club in the competition is Benfica, who have won the title twice.





European Cup Stadium:


Here are some notable stadiums that have hosted European Cup/UEFA Champions League matches, along with some details:



Santiago Bernabéu (Madrid, Spain):

The home of Real Madrid, the Bernabéu has hosted four European Cup/Champions League finals, including the 2010 final. The stadium has a capacity of over 80,000 spectators and is one of the most iconic stadiums in European football.




Wembley Stadium (London, England):

The original Wembley Stadium hosted the 1963, 1968, 1971, 1978, and 1992 finals of the European Cup, while the new Wembley Stadium has hosted the 2011 and 2013 finals of the Champions League. The stadium has a capacity of 90,000 and is the home of the England national team.




Camp Nou (Barcelona, Spain): 

The largest stadium in Europe with a capacity of over 99,000 spectators, Camp Nou is the home of Barcelona and has hosted several Champions League finals, including the 1989, 1999, and 2011 finals.




San Siro (Milan, Italy):

The home of both AC Milan and Inter Milan, San Siro has hosted four European Cup/Champions League finals, including the 1965, 1970, 2001, and 2016 finals. The stadium capacity over 80,000 spectators.




Estadio da Luz (Lisbon, Portugal):

The largest stadium in Portugal with a capacity of over 64,000 spectators, Estadio da Luz hosted the 2014 Champions League final, which saw Real Madrid defeat Atletico Madrid in extra time.




Allianz Arena (Munich, Germany): 

The home of Bayern Munich, Allianz Arena has hosted the 2012 Champions League final, which saw Chelsea defeat Bayern Munich on penalties. The stadium has a capacity of over 75,000 spectators and is known for its striking exterior design.




Stade de France (Paris, France): 

The national stadium of France, Stade de France hosted the 2000 Champions League final, which saw Real Madrid defeat Valencia 3-0. The stadium capacity over 80,000 spectators and is one of the largest stadiums in Europe.





Atatürk Olympic Stadium (Istanbul, Turkey):

The largest stadium in Turkey with a capacity of over 76,000 spectators, Atatürk Olympic Stadium hosted the memorable 2005 Champions League final, which saw Liverpool come back from a 3-0 deficit to defeat AC Milan on penalties.




Signal Iduna Park (Dortmund, Germany):

The home of Borussia Dortmund, Signal Iduna Park has a capacity of over 81,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 2013 final, which was held at Wembley Stadium but featured Borussia Dortmund as one of the finalists.





Olympiastadion (Berlin, Germany):

The stadium that hosted the 2006 World Cup final, Olympiastadion has also hosted several Champions League finals, including the 2015 final, which saw Barcelona defeat Juventus 3-1. The stadium capacity  over 74,000 spectators.




Estádio do Dragão (Porto, Portugal): 

The home of Porto, Estádio do Dragão has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 2004 final, which saw Porto defeat Monaco 3-0 to win the trophy of second time in the history. The stadium capacity over 50,000 spectators.




Parc des Princes (Paris, France):

The home of Paris Saint-Germain, Parc des Princes has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 2019 final, which was held at the Wanda Metropolitano in Madrid but featured PSG as one of the finalists. The stadium capacity over 47,000 spectators.




Giuseppe Meazza (Milan, Italy):

The stadium that is home to both AC Milan and Inter Milan, Giuseppe Meazza has a capacity of over 80,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League finals, including the 2001 final, which saw Bayern Munich defeat Valencia on penalties.




Anfield (Liverpool, England):

The home of Liverpool, Anfield has a capacity of over 53,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League matches, including the famous 2005 final, which saw Liverpool come back from a 3-0 deficit to defeat AC Milan on penalties.




Old Trafford (Manchester, England):

The home of Manchester United, Old Trafford has a capacity of over 74,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 2003 final, which saw AC Milan defeat Juventus on penalties.




San Siro (Milan, Italy):

Another iconic Italian stadium, San Siro is home to both AC Milan and Inter Milan, and has a capacity of over 75,000 spectators. The stadium has hosted several Champions League finals, including the 2016 final, which saw Real Madrid defeat Atletico Madrid on penalties.





Camp Nou (Barcelona, Spain):

The home of Barcelona, Camp Nou is the largest stadium in Europe, with a capacity of over 99,000 spectators. The stadium has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 1999 final, which saw Manchester United defeat Bayern Munich in dramatic fashion.




Santiago Bernabeu (Madrid, Spain):

The home of Real Madrid, Santiago Bernabeu has a capacity of over 81,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League finals, including the 2010 final, which saw Inter Milan defeat Bayern Munich 2-0.




Estádio da Luz (Lisbon, Portugal):

The home of Benfica, Estádio da Luz has a capacity of over 64,000 spectators and hosted the 2014 Champions League final, which saw Real Madrid defeat Atletico Madrid 4-1 after extra time.




Allianz Arena (Munich, Germany):

The home of Bayern Munich, Allianz Arena has a capacity of over 75,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 2012 final, which saw Chelsea defeat Bayern Munich on penalties.




Stamford Bridge (London, England):

The home of Chelsea, Stamford Bridge has a capacity of over 40,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 2008 final, which saw Manchester United defeat Chelsea on penalties.





Emirates Stadium (London, England):

The home of Arsenal, Emirates Stadium has a capacity of over 60,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 2019 final, which was held at the Wanda Metropolitano in Madrid but featured Tottenham Hotspur as one of the finalists.




Wembley Stadium (London, England):

The largest stadium in the United Kingdom, Wembley has a capacity of over 90,000 spectators and has hosted several European Cup/Champions League finals, including the 2011 final,  Barcelona defeated Manchester United 3-1.





Parc des Princes (Paris, France):

The home of Paris Saint-Germain, Parc des Princes has a capacity of over 47,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 2020 final, which was held in Lisbon due to the COVID-19 pandemic.




Estadio do Dragao (Porto, Portugal):

The home of FC Porto, Estadio do Dragao has a capacity of over 50,000 spectators and hosted the 2021 Champions League final, which saw Chelsea defeat Manchester City 1-0.





Olympiastadion (Berlin, Germany):

The former home of Hertha Berlin and the 1936 Olympic Games, Olympiastadion has a capacity of over 74,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League finals, including the 2015 final, which saw Barcelona defeat Juventus 3-1.





Giuseppe Meazza (Milan, Italy):

Formerly known as San Siro, Giuseppe Meazza is home to both AC Milan and Inter Milan and has a capacity of over 75,000 spectators. The stadium has hosted several Champions League finals, including the 2001 final, which saw Bayern Munich defeat Valencia on penalties.




Signal Iduna Park (Dortmund, Germany):

The home of Borussia Dortmund, Signal Iduna Park has a capacity of over 81,000 spectators and has hosted several Champions League matches, including the 2013 final, Bayern Munich defeated Borussia Dortmund 2-1.





Luzhniki Stadium (Moscow, Russia):

The national stadium of Russia, Luzhniki has a capacity of over 80,000 spectators and hosted the 2008 Champions League final, which saw Manchester United defeat Chelsea on penalties.




Olympiakó Stádio Athinon (Athens, Greece): 

The home of Olympiacos, Olympiakó Stádio Athinon has a capacity of over 32,000 spectators and hosted the 2007 Champions League final, which saw AC Milan defeat Liverpool 2-1.

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